Sunday, June 3, 2012

Shredded Umbrella Plant

Day 134
The Daily DuBrule

One of the most challenging aspects of gardening in the shade is to have excellent foliage structure after the early spring wildflowers finish blooming. So many wonderful shade plants melt down from June onward, leaving gaps in what used to be a magical garden. Enter the shredded umbrella plant.

What a perfect common name, as it describes Syneilesis aconitifolia to a "T". The leaves start out as slightly wooly foliage, gradually becoming flat topped and umbrella-like and 18" tall. They are finely dissected and toothed. In early June tiny white flowers rise up on long wands high above the leaves. The flowers are a non-event and some people cut them off. I leave them on because they draw even more attention to this unusual plant in our shade demonstration gardens. Native to Korea and Japan, I find this rare woodland plant extremely durable, growing easily in the roots of trees and reliably hard. The species name "aconitifolium" refers to the fact that the leaves resemble monkshood leaves. After a rainstorm, they hold water in the center which only adds to their charm.

 

2 comments:

  1. Lovely write up and very helpful to me. I just purchased three and was looking for info and found this post. I hope it does well in Tennessee. I love your pairings with yours.

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  2. They are finely dissected and toothed. In early June tiny white flowers rise up on long wands high above the leaves.travel umbrella

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